Thanksgiving Special: Get Stuffed

StuffingI’ve heard some argue that when stuffing (also known as dressing, although that is a hotly debated topic) is done right it can be the highlight of a Thanksgiving meal. With so many delicious food options, this may be a somewhat controversial viewpoint. What can’t be denied though is that humans have thought that stuffing was a damn good idea long before the first Thanksgiving or the discovery of the New World.

The exact origin of stuffing can’t be exactly pinpointed. However, I would imagine that the practice has occurred ever since people have been ripping the entrails out of carcasses. Many seem to have forgotten that stuffing is supposed to be on the inside of an animal, not in a baking dish next to it. The first written record of stuffing fares from the Roman Empire in a cookbook titled De Re Coquinaria. It contained recipes for a variety of stuffed animals; including hares, pigs and chickens. For the most part the stuffing consisted of a variety of vegetables, spices, nuts and herbs, as well as spelt and organ meat. It of course wasn’t called ‘stuffing’ at the time, in fact that word didn’t appear in print until about 1538. Prior to this, it was mostly referred to as farce which came from the Latin farcire which meant ‘to stuff.’ By the Victorian era, the word ‘stuffing’ became a little too crass for 19th century sensibilities and was thusly referred to as dressinginstead, which we of course know is still used today interchangeably.

It can’t be known exactly when stuffing became popular in America, however, written evidence shows that it was a Thanksgiving staple by at least 1836. It’s more than likely that it has been utilised far earlier though, after all, there was already a long historical tradition of the practice. Also, you gotta stuff a bird with something. What we do know for sure is that different parts of the nation adapted the dish early on in order to incorporate local flavours. For example, in the Boston area oyster based stuffings are incredibly popular. One of the earliest printed recipes is from the 1832 Cook’s Own Book which instructed “Fill your chickens with young oysters cut small, truffles, parsley and spices, and roast them.” Comparatively, New England stuffing at the time tended to incorporate chestnuts, and often continues to today. In the South, cornbread based stuffing is the way to go, although they tend to refer to it as the aforementioned dressing.

There’s no evidence to show exactly when stuffing left the animal cavities and became a side dish onto itself. However, it could be argued that it at least became widespread during the early 1970s. This was due to the the release of Ruth Siems’ Stovetop Stuffing in 1972 by General Foods, which is now known as Kraft Foods. It was quick, convenient and tasty, and therefore was an instant hit. Today, over sixty millions boxes are sold every year at Thanksgiving time. As an Australian, I still don’t quite understand the idea of a roasting pan full of stuffing. As a historian, I think I’m obliged to examine the matter by making a huge batch for this years Friendsgiving I’m attending. All in the name of research, of course.

The Delicious History Podcast Project

Greetings, Food History Lovers!

It was a year ago that I first started this blog. It’s been an amazing journey so far, and I’ve be fortunate enough to find that there are quite a few people out there who are interested in the tasty world of Food History. I now want to take the next step in sharing my food related historical tidbits with the world by creating a companion podcast to go with the website. I think it will be an fantastic way to build a larger following, as well as prove how fun and delicious history can be. Who doesn’t love a little food and humour with their education

Now here’s the tricky part. Thanks to a recent redundancy, I need your help you make this dream a reality. Podcasts need equipment, software, media hosting, artwork, and music – all of which need to be paid for. Because I can’t rely on the kindness of retailers to simply give me the resources I need, I’m hoping that some of my beloved readers can help me to get Delicious History onto the internet airwaves.The best part about pledging to the Delicious History Podcast Project is that every donation entitles you to a reward. That’s right, if we hit our target you not only get Delicious History in your earbuds, you also get a BONUS PRIZE. What’s not to love?

So if you love food, history or my good self, please help get Delicious History into an iTunes store near you! If you also wouldn’t mind reblogging or sharing the project with your friends and other fellow history lovers, I’d be eternally grateful.Simply follow the link below for more info or to make a pledge -Delicious History Podcast Project
Thank you in advance for supporting Delicious History and for making this first year in the blogosphere truly amazing.

A (Belated) Pancake Day Post

Nothing I could say would do this picture justice.

Welcome back, History Lovers.

After a bit of a hectic hiatus, I’m back to serve you up some of the most delicious food related tales from history.

My friend Sally wanted me to write a post on Pancake Day, and although it’s quite late, I’m still sticking to my word. In any case, pancakes are always worthy of examination so I doubt that anyone is going to get too upset over my tardiness.

Pancake Day, or Shrove Tuesday, is an annual event that falls 47 days before Easter Sunday. As such, the date varies from year to year and can fall anytime between 3 February – 9th of March. Pancake Day is of course the last day before the period of Lent begins, a time of strict abstinence that ends with Easter.

The name ‘shrove’ is derived from the old word ‘strive’ which means ‘to confess’. During the Middle Ages, people would confess their sins on Shrove Tuesday and ask for absolution from God before the commencement of Lent.

So how did pancakes come to be associated with such an important and solemn Christian tradition?

As previously mentioned, Lent is a time when one would give up luxuries, particularly those of the culinary persuasion. Traditionally, eggs and butter were two items that used to be forbidden during the time of Lent as they were considered to be a luxury. It’s believed that pancakes were made in order to use up the leftover eggs and butter. In modern times, people tend to be more inclined to give up things such as chocolate.

A modern-day Pancake Race. I seriously would love to get in on this action.

One of the more amusing traditions surrounding Pancake Day is the Pancake Race, which began in Olney, England in 1445. The contestants, traditionally women, carry a frying pan and race to over a 415 yard course to the finishing line. The rules are strict: contestants must toss their pancake at both the start and the finish of the race, as well as wear an apron and a scarf. When men want to participate, they must dress up as a housewife, usually with an apron and a bandanna.

This tradition was born out of a story about a woman cooking pancakes on Shrove Tuesday. She heard the shriving bell summoning her to confession, which she was running late for. The cut off time was 12pm, so she ran to church wearing her apron and still holding a frying pan with a pancake in it. The result of this was a tradition that has now lasted for over five hundred years.

Some tasty Shrove Tuesday pancake variations from around the United Kingdom include -

Welsh Pancakes – Also known as Welsh Cakes or Light cakes. They are made with sour cream and buttermilk, spread with butter and then piled on top of one another. Sometimes, various ingredients such as fish, cheese, sugar or jam (not altogether, gross) are added between each layer and then the pile is cut into quarters.

Gloucester Pancakes – Made with suet, which gives them a rich and grainy texture. They are traditionally served with golden syrup.

Harvest Pancakes – Often served to the poor, they are made with a mild ale, powdered ginger, and chopped apples. They are then cooked in lard and given to farm hands.

Rich Pancakes – Large and thin, these are made made with cream, nutmeg, and dark sherry before being fried in butter and getting the hell in my belly.

But wait, there’s more! Check out some of the Pancake Tuesday variations from around the world -

France - Mardis Gras, which translates to mean Fat Tuesday/Grease Tuesday. The name refers to the last night of eating rich, fatty foods before the ritual fasting of the Lenten season. Mardis Gras is also the name of the carnival season in New Orleans, which also finds its roots in the preparation for Lent. Celebrations are concentrated for about two weeks before and throughout Fat Tuesday.

Brazil - Terca-feira Gorda, which also translates to mean Fat Tuesday. The Brazilians celebrate with a three day carnival that concludes on Fat Tuesday.

Iceland – Sprengidagur, which translates to ‘bursting day’. I don’t think that needs any further explanation.

Greece - Apocreas, meaning ‘of the meat’. The name is significant because its the last chance to eat meat due to being forbidden during Lent.

Yep, the solemn season of Lent was indeed born out of naked frolicking and drunken debauchery, also known as Saturnalia

I think that one of the most interesting facts about Pancake Day, and the Lenten season in general, is its origin. Despite being a Catholic holiday, its beginnings can be found in Saturalia,  an ancient Roman festival that honoured the God Saturn. The holiday was celebrated with a sacrifice at the Temple of Saturn in the Roman Forum and with a public banquet. This was followed by private gift-giving, continual partying, and a general carnival atmosphere that overturned societal norms. Naturally, the Catholic Church adopted the festival and turned it into a farewell to all things indulgent, as well as a season for religious discipline.

After much consideration and research, I have decided that despite my love of pancakes with maple syrup and bacon, I would much rather party on down with the Romans.